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Walter Wanderley

Boss of Bossa Nova

Boss of Bossa Nova
 

Brazilian Music
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Walter Wanderley: Talkin' Verve

Walter Wanderley: Talkin's Verve
(1998)

Walter's music is really something of the highest musical caliber and at the same time something that noone with enough musical ear and sensibility could dislike. Absolutly. This music is also some of the coolest music ever recorded in my opinion, Jazz masters included. It is a fantastic mix of Jazz and brasilian elements with accent on syncopation at a point where entertainment is so high that it has never been reached again by any other western musician after him. Sadly syncopation has never been explored enough by western musicians, I don't know why. In Jazz for example after Bird noone reached his level of comprehension of syncopation and after Coltrane the thing itself has been almost forgotten. Maybe it's a gift only few musicians have and it is a too difficult thing to emulate if you don't have that feeling naturally. However Walter had syncopation. You can bet on it. And an immense musicality. His interpretations of brasilian standards and pop favorities are crazy. Fantastic. --an Amazon reviewer
 


A Certain Smile, a Certain Sadness

A Certain Smile, A Certain Sadness
with Walter Wanderley
(1966)

When Astrud Gilberto (wife to the great singer and guitarist Joao Gilberto) sang the now-classic "The Girl from Ipanema" in 1964, she'd had no formal vocal training. It mattered little, as her laid-back sensuality overflowed through the song and propelled her on to several more musical projects. This 1966 collection with the small combo of organist Walt Wanderley, guitarist João Gilberto, bassist José Marino, and Claudio Slon on drums features Gilberto's reposed voice in such a seductive, warm light, one thinks they've died and gone to drink martinis in a Rio lounge. The album includes a mix of classic bossa nova tunes ("So Nice" and "Call Me") sung in both English and Portuguese. Astrud was as cool as a cucumber and her untrained, nonchalant grace gave her singing its unique charisma. It wasn't until the late 1980s that the world heard this sort of passive, detached persona again in the bewitching vocals of Cesaria Evora, proving once again that style and delivery are just as important as distinct vocal tone. Astrud Gilberto taught us great singers aren't made on a voice alone. --Karen K. Hugg
 

Samba Swing

Samba Swing!
compilation with 15 tracks
(1996)
 

Boss of Bossa Nova

Boss of Bossa Nova
45-track retrospective on 2 discs
(1996)
 

Brazil's Greatest Hits

Brazil's Greatest Hits
compilation with 20 tracks
(1972)


Moondreams

Moondreams
(1969)


Batucada

Batucada
(1967)


Cheganca

Cheganca
(1966)
 

Rain Forest

Rain Forest
(1966)
includes the hit "Summer Samba"


Samba E Mais Samba

O Samba E Mais Samba
(1962)
 

Also See:

Brazilian Lounge Music

Wanda Sa     Astrud Gilberto      Sergio Mendes

Bossa Nova   Antonio Carlos Jobim   Stan Getz

Vinicius de Moraes   João Gilberto   Music Index


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